Insightful... Provocative... Opinion-Shaping...

“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn…” Benjamin Franklin “

Insightful… Provocative… Opinion-Shaping…

A Reminder from “The Engineers of Life”…

We believe the ability to effectively develop/grow people in ways that they can accomplish results they have not strived to achieve or have been unable to achieve historically requires the “extraordinary” ability of “Involving the Learner” in the Learning Process. Remember, “… Involve Me and I Learn”.

We share this reminder of sorts because we believe the ability to “Involve the Learner” in the Learning Process is an important skill set for people responsible for overseeing the growth/development of others which includes people in roles such as parent, teacher, business leader/owner, minister, coach and more…

So why do we refer to this skill set of involving the Learner as “extraordinary”? As easy as this is to understand, our observations of most people in roles responsible for developing/growing others spend the majority of their time “telling and teaching” instead of “involving”. Why is that you’re asking? It is because “involving the learner” in the learning process is very hard to do. Really? Yes, really, and here’s what we’ve learned as to why.

Most of the people we have observed in roles responsible for developing/growing others believe they are primarily responsible for the desired results of an initiative while the development/growth of the learner is a secondary objective. And by the way, this belief works well with urgent and short-term initiatives. However, when this belief is in play for longer-term and less urgent initiatives, what is created is a dysfunctional situation promoting Learner “dependency” over Learner “personal responsibility”. And as the dysfunction continues, the Learner becomes resentful, less engaged and behaves in unpredictable and unproductive ways. Hence we have parent/child, teacher/student, employer/employee challenges and issues that are all far to common.

The second reason “involving” is difficult is the fear of failure will be elevated because of losing control of the Learner and the potential outcome of a particular initiative. When this happens, the ability to react without becoming critical will be tested while trying to regain control. In other words, allowing the Learner to struggle, to let go of the need to fix or be the problem solver, and to accept the results without becoming critical and confrontational will be challenged. On the other hand, responding by clarifying the Learner’s responsibilities and subsequent consequences of succeeding or failing to achieve the expected results demonstrates the belief, understanding and skill set of “Involving the Learner” in the learning process.

We hope you find this REMINDER useful…please feel free to share your thoughts and comments about this important skill set of involving the Learner in the Learning Process…

In the Spirit of Learning through Life…
Jimmie and Charlie Watson
“The Engineers of Life”

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